Applied Biosafety: Journal of the
American Biological Safety Association

Volume 10, Number 4, 2005

Applied Biosafety, v.10 n.4

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Attention Authors (PDF 52KB)

Guidelines for Submissions (PDF 68KB)

Copyright Permission and Acknowledgment Form (PDF 176KB)

Sample Reference Styles (PDF 196KB)

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Download Complete Issue (PDF 2.5MB)

Letters to the Editors(PDF 44KB)

President's Page(PDF 52KB)

Articles

Comparison of the Canadian Industrial Security Manual and the United States National Industrial Security Program Operating Manual(PDF 128KB)
Andrew Hammond

The Infectious Dose of Francisella tularensis (Tularemia)(PDF 220KB)
Rachael M. Jones, Mark Nicas, Alan Hubbard, Matthew D. Sylvester, and Arthur Reingold

High-Dose Ultraviolet C Light Inactivates Spores of Bacillus Atrophaeus and Bacillus Anthracis Sterne on Nonreflective Surfaces(PDF 220KB)
Marie U. Owens, David R. Deal, Michael O. Shoemaker, Gregory B. Knudson, Janet E. Meszaros, and Jeffery L. Deal

Autoclave Testing in a University Setting(PDF 84KB)
Richard N. Le, Amy L. Hicks, and Janice Dodge

Operating a BSL-4 Laboratory in a University Setting(PDF 100KB)
Tradeline Publications

Special Features

Use of Multiple SOP Styles to Increase Personnel Compliance and Safety Within a BSL-2/BSL-3 Animal Facility(PDF 124KB)
Andrea Mitchell, Jeri Ellis, and Tim Ruddy

Book Review - Revenge of the Microbes by Abigail A. Salyers and Dixie D. Whitt(PDF 52KB)
Reviewed by George A. Pankey

Book Review - Biodefense: Principles and Pathogens Edited by Michael S. Bronze and Ronald A. Greenfield(PDF 64KB)
Reviewed by Michael P. Owen

Ask the Experts - HEPA Filtered Supply Air for BSL-3 Laboratories?(PDF 60KB)
John H. Keene

Biosafety Tips - Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus - A Hazard in Rodent Animal Colonies(PDF 72KB)
Karen B. Byers

ABSA News

2005 ABSA Conference Photos(PDF 64KB)

2005 ABSA Service Award Recipients(PDF 88KB)

New ABSA Members for 2005(PDF 40KB)

Calendar of Events(PDF 60KB)


 

About the Cover

Fransicella tularensis is the causative agent of tularemia. Exposure to F. tularensis has resulted in numerous laboratory acquired infections, some of which may have been due to aerosol exposures. Read more about infectious dose modeling on pages 227-239, "The Infectious Dose of Francisellatularensis (Tularemia)" by Rachael M. Jones, Mark Nicas, Alan Hubbard, Matthew D. Sylvester, and Arthur Reingold.

One natural reservoir for this zoonotic disease is the rabbit. It can be transmitted to humans by handling infected blood or tissue, or consuming undercooked infected meat. The tick, an arthropod vector, can transmit the disease through its bite. The symptoms developed depend on the type of exposure route.

Images from the CDC Public Health Image Library are: D. variabilis tick photo, taken by Andrew Brooks of CDC; Tularemia lesion on the dorsal skin of right hand photo, taken by Dr. Brachman of the CDC; and F. tularensis colony characteristics when grown on Chocolate, Martin Lewis or Thayer-Martin medium at 48-72 hours, courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory.


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