Applied Biosafety: Journal of the
American Biological Safety Association

Volume 13, Number 1, 2008

Applied Biosafety, v.13 n.1

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Attention Authors (PDF 52KB)

Guidelines for Submissions (PDF 68KB)

Copyright Permission and Acknowledgment Form (PDF 176KB)

Sample Reference Styles (PDF 196KB)

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Download Complete Issue (PDF 3.6MB)

President's Page(PDF 68KB)

Articles

Comparative Analysis of the Fourth and Fifth Editions of Biosafety in Microbiological and Biomedical Laboratories Section IV (BSL2-4)(PDF 176KB)
Charles J. Crews and Edward E. Gaunt

Inactivation of Francisella tularensis Schu S4 in a Biological Safety Cabinet Using Hydrogen Peroxide Fumigation(PDF 804KB)
James V. Rogers and Young W. Choi

Stability of Viral Pathogens in the Laboratory Environment(PDF 236KB)
Hector N. Valtierra

Rapid and Biologically Safe Procedures for the Evaluation of Antigen-Specific T Cell Response to Microbial Pathogens That May Be Used in the BSL-3 and BSL-4 Environment(PDF 216KB)
Chiara Agrati, Ilaria Volpi, Federico Martini, Cristiana Gioia, Concetta Castilletti, Giuseppe Ippolito, Maria Rosaria Capobianchi, and Fabrizio Poccia

Development and Validation of a Pilot Scale Enhanced Biosafety Level Two Containment for Performance Evaluation of Produce Disinfection Technologies(PDF 724KB)
Joseph E. Sites, Paul N. Walker, Angela Burke, and Bassam A. Annous

Evaluation of the Public Review Process and Risk Communication at High-Level Biocontainment Laboratories(PDF 252KB)
Margaret S. Race

Special Features

Biosafety Tips - Cell Sorters Present Containment Challenges(PDF 112KB) - Karen B. Byers

Molecular Biosafety - A Reassessment of Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Vector Risks That Takes New Information on Insertional Mutagenesis into Account(PDF 116KB) - Margy S. Lambert

Capsule - Effectiveness of Personal Protective Measures to Prevent Lyme Disease(PDF 84KB) - Ed Krisiunas

Ask the Experts - Biosafety Cabinets, Containment Facility Maintenance, and More(PDF 84KB) - John H. Keene

ABSA News

Tradeline Publications: Battelle Increases BSL-3 and ABSL-3 Research Space(PDF 136KB)

2007 ABSA Service Award Recipients(PDF 64KB)

2007 ABSA Conference Sponsors(PDF 84KB)

New ABSA Members for 2008(PDF 92KB)

Calendar of Events(PDF 48KB)


 

About the Cover

United States Department of Agriculture, Eastern Regional Research Center, Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, personnel are inspecting cantaloupes during a wash treatment at the Biosafety Level-2 pilot scale, Produce Processing Facility. The processing (dump) tank in the foreground is a custom fabricated jacketed 1,000 liter vessel constructed of 304L stainless steel, and built to Dairy Industry Standard 3A for stainless steel sanitary finish. Dump tank operation is fully automated through a data acquisition and control system developed at the USDA using National Instruments components and software. This control system allows researchers at the USDA to adjust the temperature between 3C and 96C and the residence time between 30 seconds and 10 minutes during produce wash treatment studies. Such studies are designed to determine the efficacy of conventional and experimental wash treatments on inactivating spoilage and human pathogens on produce surfaces. To learn more about the influence of biosafety on food safety and research read the article on pages 30-44 by Joseph E. Sites, Paul N. Walker, Angela Burke, and Bassam A. Annous. (Photo courtesy of Paul Pierlott.)


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